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ANOTHER WILD MAN.

Empire (Sydney, NSW)
Date: November 27, 1871
Page Number: 3
NEARLY every county in California has, in some period during the last twenty years, had a sensation in the shape of a wild man or a haunted house. Fresno county has hitherto been unable to cope with her sister counties in these particulars, but the Expositor has brought her out of the lurch at last. During the past summer the workmen at the New Idria quicksilver mines have on several occasions, while out hunting or engaged in other pursuits, come upon a strange looking personage, with long scraggy hair, and in an almost nude condition. The instant, though,that this strange being discovers the presence of any one he bounds away with the speed of an antelope, and is soon lost to view. Up to this time, although most careful research has been made, all
attempts to discover the place of abode of this marvel have proven futile. The native Californians and Mexicans, who form the greater portion of the population at the mines, have a tradition that he is a man who was captured, robbed, and held captive by the celebrated Californian brigand, Joaquin, who made the mountain valleys in the vicinity mentioned a retreat, and that he finally made his escape, but in a disordered state of mind, and has since abode among the rocks and in the caverns in that region, subsisting on roots, berries, insects, or whatever else eatable he could obtain. It is interesting to learn that these statements were furnished by a reliable party.

--San Francisco Bulletin.
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Joaquin Murrieta was an infamous figure in California during the California Gold Rush of the 1850s. Depending on the point of view, he was considered an infamous bandit or a Mexican patriot.
WILD MAN.

Queanbeyan Age (NSW)
Date: December 14, 1871
Page Number: 2
We gather from our Cooma contemporary, that "from the fastnesses of the Jingeras, adjacent to or in the district of Monaro, comes the startling intelligence that a 'wild man' has been seen in that place. A little girl, the grand-daughter of Mr. Joseph Ward, senior, of Mittagang, asserts that she has seen an old man, whose back is bent, and body covered with a thick coat of hair, --in height (to use the girl's words), about the same as her grandfather. The strange being in question had nails of a tremendous length on his hands, and he seemed desirous of shunning the girl. The main points of the assertion are given with remarkable earnestness by Mr. Ward's grand-daughter; nothing can shake the simple outlines of her story. Confirmatory of the above incident, is the statement made by Mr. Kelly, of the Jingeras, who says that he has himself seen the 'wild man.' Anent the above, there is a tradition among the settlers of this place that the mysterious monster, the "yahoo," is a denizen of the mountainous country where the 'wild man' has been discovered, and that it is only observable in stormy weather, or on the approach of bad seasons."
Joseph Ward Snr:
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Hairy man:

MONARO REGION,
SE NSW
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Date: April 25, 1872
Page Number: 7
A strong body of police, accompanied by a number of the residents on the ranges east of the town, started off this morning for the purpose of trying to capture the individual who has now acquired the appellation of "the Wild Man," and who has been represented by several persons to have been seen of late, the last information being that he yesterday morning chased, in a state of perfect nudity, a son of Mr. Fortune, the painter, several hundred yards. Up to the time of writing, nothing had been reported of the success or otherwise of the searching party. Some of the police officers begin to entertain the opinion that, though such an apparition has been seen, the whole thing is a stupid and rather dangerous hoax.
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Date: April 23, 1872
Page Number: 6
"Over a dozen members of the police force and some private citizens were engaged on Saturday and Sunday," the Ballarat Star states, "in searching the ranges between Ballarat and Warrenheip for a 'wild man,' said to live somewhere about there. This eccentric and ferocious individual does not wear as much clothing as the cold weather would warrant, and has a habit of prowling by night, and of looking at passers-by, and then bolting in the day-time. The police did not succeed in finding him."
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
The North Eastern Ensign (Benalla, VIC.)
Date: April 26, 1872
Page Number: 3
The Ballarat police have been unable as yet to arrest the naked lunatic now running wild in that district, and he appears to have shifted his quarters. One of the Ballarat evening journals states that "a lad was proceeding along a bush road near his father's residence to the north-east of Mount Xavier and within a mile of the Orphan Asylum, when the wild man rushed out of a roughly constructed mia-mia on the side of the road and gave chase. The lad describes the man as being as nude as when born, and states that his skin was quite red-looking from exposure. The man screamed out for the lad to stop, but without effect. He then chased him for two or three hundred yards, when the boy got clear away and lost sight of the lunatic of the ranges. Acting on this information, Sergeant Larner and some three or four members of the Ballarat East police force left the station in the afternoon, with Mr Fortune's son, as guide, for the scene of the mia-mia."
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
THE WILD MAN ON THE RANGES.

Empire (Sydney, NSW)
Date: April 26, 1872
Page Number: 3
We stated some week or so ago that a man in a semi-nude state, and supposed to be insane, was causing some consternation amongst the residents at the foot of the Eastern ranges, near the rifle butts, by his strange goings on. This morning a wood carter named John Hogan, residing at Navigators', reported to sergeant Larner, at the Eastern police station, that while on his way from Navigators' to Ballarat he, this morning, came across the wild
man, who was dressed in a woman's petticoat or skirt, and had on an old straw hat. Hogan met the man at the top of Sawpit Gully, near the rifle butts. The unfortunate wanderer no sooner saw Hogan than he uttered a shrill scream, and run off into the bush. Yesterday evening a small farmer named Woodworth, with some members of his family, heard fearful, screams proceeding from the vicinity of the rifle butts, and, on going to ascertain the cause, discovered the wild man in a potato paddock. He was rooting up the potatoes at the time, but on seeing Woodworth and the others instantly made off into the scrub. A man came across the wanderer one day last week near Harry Light's paddock. The unfortunate was dressed just the same way as described by Hogan and Woodworth, and approached within about ten yards of the man who surprised him. The nude man signified that he wanted tobacco, and this was offered, but had to he thrown to the ground some distunce from the giver before the wild man would pick it up. When he did so, he put the weed into his mouth, and seemed to devour it ravenously. It seems the unhappy lunatic subsists on potatoes and the green tops of the vegetables. This afternoon Sub-inspector Ryell accompanied sergeant Larner, in command of one or two mounted and several foot police, to the vicinity of Sawpit Gully, where they were to be joined by Hogan and others in search after the wild lunatic.

--Ballarat Evening Post, 20th April.
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
The Mercury (Hobart, Tas.)
Date: April 30, 1872
Page Number: 3
The Ballarat Star of Thursday says:--The police yesterday made a most determined effort to catch the "wild man," who for the last few weeks has been the terror of women and children living in the bush in the neighbourhood of the rifle butts. This man is said to roam about without a vestige of clothing on his person, thus showing a great deal of recklessness as far as regards his constitution, as the nights of late have been very cold, and the ground decidedly damp. He has never yet done any act of violence, but he has been seen by two boys and by one or two women, while on one occasion he succeeded in howling with suoh effect that the residents in a small hut in the bush were deprived of their sleep. None of the hen-roosts in tho locality have suffered as far as we can learn, but one day this man was seen by a boy in the act of cooking some potatoes. On Wednesday morning, Sargeant Larner, Mounted-constable Fox, and Constables Doyle, Thompson, Coffey, Molloy, and Smith, with about thirty other persons anxious for a little excitement, assembled at Collins' Cremorne hotel, and a well organised search was instituted, no part of the ranges being left unsearched for miles around. Still, the "wild man" was not caught, and if he is mad, as is supposed, he manages to exorcise a good deal of discretion in only showing himself to women and children. On Wednesday morning a lad, who was cutting saplings in the bush, says he saw a man with only a sheepskin over him, running towards him and whistling. The boy bolted, and dropped his hat and his axe in his flight. He afterwards took the police to the spot, which was three-quarters of a mile from his home, and the hat and axe were found where they had been dropped, but the man with the sheepskin was not about. After searching for six or seven hours the party returned unsuccessful, and no further attempt will be made to catch the man until he shows himself again. If he reads the newspapers, and from what some say, it is possible that he does, he will take the hint and keep quiet.
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
SEEKING FURTHER
INFORMATION
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Date: April 30, 1872
Page Number: 3
The police seem to be in doubt yet as to whether the unfortunate Chinaman captured yesterday was the wild man or not. A good many people do not think he is identical with that rather mythical personage. He is an emaciated-looking being, to whom one would scarcely give credit for the amount of agility displayed by the alleged wild man. He, however, is better in the custody of the police than in the state in which he was found. He was taken before the Bench this morning, under the name of Ah Goon, and sentenced to 12 months imprisonment.
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
MAN HUNTING AT BALLARAT.

Empire (Sydney, NSW)
Date: May 1, 1872
Page Number: 4
There was a great hunt, yesterday, after the "wild man of the woods." At about half-past 10 in the morning a company of between thirty and forty horsemen and pedestrians assembled at the Cremorne Hotel, and placed themselves under the lead of sergeant Larner, who had several constables with him. The party, which also included a number of dogs, then started for the ranges, and scoured the bush for miles around, taking in Slaughteryard-hill, the Butts, Yankee Flat, Gay's Lead, Navigators, and all the country lying between Buninyong and Warrenheip. The search was continued up till 5 o'clock in the evening, and the country was crossed and recrossed ; the various parties separating and diverging, and collecting again at the sound of Larner's shrill whistle, but all to no purpose. Every gully, every slope, every bush or clump of trees with a suspicious-looking aspect, which came within range of the searchers ; was investigated ; but not even a wild cat was discovered, much less a wild man. A tunnel 250 feet long on the White Hills was explored from end to end, but fruitlessly, and at last the party became so sensitive to the pangs of hunger and fatigue, that it was a most fortunate thing for the wild man that he did not make his appearance, or it is more than probable he would have been "turned off," or boned and flailed, to serve as luncheon for his pursuers. It is said that sergeant Larner himself was lost to the party for some time in the middle of the afternoon, and that he was eventually discovered following the tracks of a baker's cart, which he was anxiously hoping to be able to "stick up" for a loaf of bread. The last of the search party (including the sergeant) did not reach town again until 5 o'clock in the evening ; and although the search was an unsuccessful one, ample evidence was discovered during the day that the existence of the wild man was not a mere invention of the brain. Several mia-mias were met with, which he must have very recently occupied; and about 8 o'clock yesterday morning he was seen by a boy who was cutting wood in Light's paddock, near Sawpit gully. He had a sheepskin over his shoulders, and ran after the lad, who dropped his hat and his axe, and took to his heels. The axe was afterwards picked up by a constable on the spot where it was left by the boy. It is stated that the wild man has killed several calves in the neighbourhood, and has torn up and devoured a quantity of potatoes from some of the paddocks.

--Ballarat Courier, April 25.
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
The Mercury (Hobart, Tas.)
Date: May 4, 1872
Page Number: 3
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
A Celestial, with the head of an ape and a body as filthy as the worst occupant of the Cow Miracles, was yesterday morning placed on the floor of the court in Ballarat. He was a wretched product of pagan immigration. His appearance almost justified the belief which existed yesterday that the "wild man had been caught," for a gleam of insanity was easily to be detected in his eye, and not even the wildest member of a Tartar horde could have presented so repulsive an external aspect. The poor wretch (says the Ballarat Mail) got a very bad character as one of our Chinese "failures." He was a decidedly unsuccessful colonist, for he lived like the "coneys" in holes or like the savages in mia-mias, built in spots where the neighbourhood did not become too hot to hold him, owing to the proclivities of the colonial boy for stoning him. He ate--so said Constable Mansfield--disgusting food, unfit for dogs, and covered himself up from the cold with wretched sacks and sugar mats. Twelve months in gaol were awarded to him, and since liberty could not have been so very pleasant to him under the circumstances narrated, no doubt he will enjoy his incarceration.
THE WILDMAN.

Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic.)
Date: May 6, 1872
Page Number: 3
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
"They have caught the wild man" was rumoured about town at an early hour yester- day morning, and, naturally enough public excitement ran high. It was perfectly true-- a wild man had been caught on the Sebastopol road, near the Iona Hotel, and that he so far resembled the veritable "wild 'un" in so far as he adapted almost the costume bit a "noble savage." The man captured turned out to be a wild, drunken fellow, named Michael Adams, whose goings on of late have somewhat startled the good folks of Redan. It seems that Constable Moran and another officer of the Redan force had a long chase after Adams at 2 o'clock this morning, and after dodging their game in and out of the creek and other places where the running became difficult, at length nailed him. The unfortunate fellow was nearly nude, and was evidently suffering from delirium produced by drinking. He said he had been out with the hounds all night, and made other incoherent statements while on his way to the lock-up. This morning he was brought before the City Bench and was remanded. In the meantime some inquiries will be made into his case.--Ballarat Post
 
THE WILD MAN OF THE RANGES.

The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas.)
Date: May 6, 1872
Page Number: 3
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
The latest theory we (Ballarat Mail) can learn is that the man is identical with a brickmaker named Rice, who some few weeks since left his father's house after a quarrel with him, almost in a state of nudity, and evidently of unsound mind. It would appear, from the statement of our informant, that Rice's wife--a woman of considerable personal attractions--deserted him, and went some distance away where she has been living with a China-man. This domestic trouble preyed upon his mind and drove him mad. He had been heard to say that if he could get a gun he would first shoot his father, and then every Chinese he came across. Since that time he has been missing from his home, and it is conjectured that he has taken to the bush. The descriptions given of his appearance by the different persons who have seen him tally in most particulars, the only point in which report differs being that some have reported him as having hair of rubicund hue, while others say his hair and beard are as black as midnight. Mr Sub-Inspector Ryall, Sergeant Larner, and a number of both mounted and foot police have been searching the ranges for several days, until men and horses are all knocked up. The officials await further and more reliable in- formation than has yet reached them.
CAPTURE OF A WILD MAN OF THE WOODS.

Empire (Sydney, NSW)
Date: May 24, 1872
Page Number: 2
IT will be remembered that the inhabitants of Hurdle Flat and its neighbourhood, were in a considerable state of alarm for some few weeks past, on account of the vagaries of a man who had been several times seen there almost in a state of nudity, brandishing a knife, and keeping as far as possible outside of the pale of civilisation. The unfortunate individual was captured yesterday morning at Ramrod Gully, in the neighbourhood of Wooragee, by constables Ward and Considine, who were out in search of him for some time past. From something that the police had heard the two constables proceeded on Wednesday to examine the ranges in the vicinity of Wooragee, and coming on an old hut, which presented the appearance of having been lately occupied, they secreted themselves to watch the place. They failed to see the occupant return, and after waiting a considerable time left, but went bnck to the place again yesterday, when they found the unfortunate fellow in the hut sittiug over a small fire, and in the act, of cooking some potatoes. He at first showed fight, and had to be collared and secured. He was brought to the Beechworth lock-up yesterday afternoon, and well treated there, soup and bread being given to him. He gave his name as John Leahy, and in answer to questions put to him slated that he came from the south of Ireland, and talked quite coherently. He said that he hnd been about two months among the ranges, and had shifted his quarters several times, and that he had obtained th potatoes found in his possession from various paddocks. He insisted on eating the potatoes he was cooking before he would go away. In his present captivity he behaves very quietly and cheerfully, and he has a by no means unintelligent face. He was, when found, badly clad, the clothes he wore exposing various parts of his limbs, and his shoes being tied together by innumerable strings. He will probably be brought before the police-court this morning, though on what charge we do not know. It may be vagrancy or insanity, but either charge being brought forward, there will be ample time for enforcing another. The "butcher's knife" is the worst feature in the case.

--Ovens and Murray Advertiser, 17th May.
Hairy man:

VICTORIAN HIGHLANDS
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Date: May 25, 1872
Page Number: 6
Speaking of the "wild man" who was recently caught at Hurdle Flat, the Ovens Spectator remarks:--"To many persons it seems surprising how a man like Power the bushranger should, for such a lengthened period, have eluded the hunt of the police, but here is a man entirely deprived of all human reason, with the instincts of an animal alone remaining, escaping--as Power did from watchful guards, and roaming through the country, a madman at large, for nearly ninemonths. In Power's case certainly he was obliged to come in contact with certain persons for the sake of obtaining food, shelter, and intelligence, but the terror of his name, and in some cases a sympathy with lawlessness, prevented their giving any information to the police. In the case of the poor 'wild man' both the sympathies and fears of all who saw him led them in quite a different direction, and yet, since August an escaped maniac travelled right through the colony from the sea to the Murray, and not only maintained himself, but invariably when seen eluded pursuit."
 

Hairy man:

VICTORIAN HIGHLANDS
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Power, Henry (Harry)
(18201891)

Bushranger.
THE WILD MAN OF THE RANGES.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Date: September 28, 1872
Page Number: 6
Hairy man:

BALLARAT REGION,
VICTORIA
At the Police court to day, a man who gave his name as Thomas Carnoc was charged as a vagrant. He presented a deplorable picture of dirt and raggedness. He is supposed by some to be identical with the "wild man" who created such a sensation not very long ago. He was remanded for a week, and ordered to be well washed and cleaned in the meantime.
 
THE HORRORS OF THE BUSH.
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic.)
Date: February 10, 1872
Page Number: 3
...
When first discovered by the police they looked like wild men; or rather, as the trooper put it, more like gorillas than human beings.
...
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YowieO
(03-01-2014)
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Contents
THE BUNYIP AGAIN.
The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW)
Date: August 24, 1872
Page Number: 7
The strange animal (says the Wagga Advertiser) reported some time ago as having been seen by Mr. Roberts in the Midgeon Lagoon, near Narandera, and for whose capture a reward of 50 was offered by that gentleman, has again been seen in the same locality, this lime by Mr. Nelson, the engineer, late of Wagga, the animal was out of the watar, and a good view was afforded as he floundered through some fifty yards of shallow water into the depths of the "Dismal Swamp," when he paddled away most vigorously until out of sight.
 

22-08-2014
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Bunyip
This Bunyip report has been included with the Wild/Hairy Man reports because it has been falsely interpreted as a Yowie report by Healy & Cropper's (2006) The Yowie: In Search of Australia's Bigfoot. It appears that Rex Gilroy is not the only Yowie-author with a tendency to make up facts (see False Yowie Facts) - compare the actual article on the left with Healy & Cropper's version on the right:    
Case 18. August 1872. Lake Cowral, south-west of Forbes, NSW.
 
While boating on Lake Cowral, a party of surveyors saw a strange animal about 150 yards [135m]. It looked "like an old man blackfellow with long, dark-coloured hair". As it swam it rose out of the water so that they could see its shoulders, and occasionally submerged as if in pursuit of fish.
 
Sydney Morning Herald, Aug 24, 1872.
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Page 208.
This error has also been repeated on page 57 of Gary Opit's (2009) Australian Cryptozoology which quotes Healy & Cropper's fictitious version instead of having checked the original source.    
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Reports of the Wild/Hairy Man part 6
Yowie / Bigfoot
1871 to 1872
THE "YAHOO," OR "DEBIL DEBIL."
Empire (Sydney, NSW)
Date: October 19, 1871
Page Number: 2
We were informed a few days ago that Windsor and its neighbourhood had been thrown into great excitement by the capture of a bunyip "Yahoo," "Debil Debil," or some other equally extraordinary creature, at Webb's Creek, Lower Hawkesbury ; and that, as its like had never before been seen by the oldest inhabitants, it was determined to forward the wonderful animal to Sydney, and there exhibit it to a wondering and gratified public. This was accordingly done, and the Yahoo has been on exhibition during the last few days at 228, Pitt-street, next to Mr. Weir, the butcher's establishment. An inspection proved the animal to be a largo wombat, of the species known as "platyrhinus," which is peculiar to New South Wales. The brute weighs about 100 lbs., and gave his captors a tough job to secure him.
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Hairy man:

CENTRAL COAST,
NSW
(08-04-2016)
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228 Pitt St, Sydney